‘My stomach’s still not back to normal’: Molly-Mae Hague debuts her scars from endometriosis surgery

, ‘My stomach’s still not back to normal’: Molly-Mae Hague debuts her scars from endometriosis surgery, The Today News USA

Molly-Mae Hague has put her tummy scars on display for the first time, after announcing she had undergone endometriosis surgery in October.

The Love Island contestant, 22, debuted the marks in a video posted to her YouTube channel on Thursday, which saw her model a black gym bra and matching leggings.

She told viewers in the body positive video: ‘My stomach is still not back to normal from when I had my endometriosis operation.

, ‘My stomach’s still not back to normal’: Molly-Mae Hague debuts her scars from endometriosis surgery, The Today News USA

Candid: Molly-Mae Hague has put her stomach scars on display for the first time, after announcing she had undergone endometriosis surgery in October

‘I don’t know if you can see but I’ve got… that’s just one of the scars from when they went into my stomach. They obviously went into my belly button as well.’

The influencer went on to quip: ‘And lower down – but I don’t think you really wanna see my vagina. Not that I need to justify why my stomach doesn’t look extra toned today but that’s why.’ 

Molly-Mae last month admitted her ‘health is not great’ as she underwent the procedure – to destroy or cut out endometriosis tissue – shortly after having lumps removed from her breast and finger.

Talking about the surgery on her YouTube channel, the Pretty Little Thing creative director said she was ‘feeling a bit of a mess’ and her recovery had taken longer then expected.  

, ‘My stomach’s still not back to normal’: Molly-Mae Hague debuts her scars from endometriosis surgery, The Today News USA

Going through it: The Love Island star previously admitted her ‘health is not great’ as she underwent the procedure in October

Endometriosis is a long-term condition where tissue similar to the lining of the womb grows in other places, such as the ovaries and fallopian tubes. 

Molly-Mae said: ‘The operation was way way harder to go through than I thought and my recovery time was quite a bit longer than I had planned and I was just a bit of a mess after that surgery. 

‘A lot of the things I’ve been talking about recently is like my health is not great – but my endometriosis video is the last now. 

‘I am done, hopefully I never have to see my doctor’s surgery or the hospital that I go to for a long time.’ 

, ‘My stomach’s still not back to normal’: Molly-Mae Hague debuts her scars from endometriosis surgery, The Today News USA

Open book: The Love Island contestant, 22, debuted the marks in a video posted to her YouTube channel on Thursday, which saw her model a black gym bra and matching leggings

, ‘My stomach’s still not back to normal’: Molly-Mae Hague debuts her scars from endometriosis surgery, The Today News USA

Documenting: She said: ‘I don’t know if you can see but I’ve got… that’s just one of the scars from when they went into my stomach. They obviously went into my belly button as well’

Molly-Mae first discovered she was suffering from endometriosis in June and has had a string of health setbacks in recent months. 

The television personality also had lumps removed from her left breast and finger. 

She told her followers: ‘They’ve sent both lumps off for testing and I’m 100% sure they’re going to be fine because I’d already had a biopsy on the one on my boob and they said it was fine and the one on my finger – I’m hopeful it’s gonna be fine.’

Molly-Mae also said her boyfriend Tommy Fury has been supporting her: ‘I’ve most definitely been resting up this week… Tommy’s been looking after me.’

, ‘My stomach’s still not back to normal’: Molly-Mae Hague debuts her scars from endometriosis surgery, The Today News USA

Soulmates: Molly-Mae also said her boyfriend Tommy Fury has been supporting her: ‘I’ve most definitely been resting up this week… Tommy’s been looking after me’ 

Molly told fans in June that she was finally diagnosed with endometriosis after her excruciating symptoms were repeatedly ignored by doctors.

Admitting that having the condition ‘wasn’t a good thing,’ Molly-Mae said the procedure could help treat the condition, but there was still chance it could return in later life.

Molly-Mae added she was repeatedly told by doctors she couldn’t have endometriosis, and finally decided to seek help from a private specialist. 

She explained: ‘Straight away they said ”You absolutely do have endometriosis, it’s clear as day”. So I guess that’s kind of a good thing because at least I know now what it is.

‘It’s not a good thing that I have endometriosis, because obviously it can affect fertility and loads of other things, and you can never really cure it.’

, ‘My stomach’s still not back to normal’: Molly-Mae Hague debuts her scars from endometriosis surgery, The Today News USA

Update: The television personality has only recently had lumps removed from her left breast and finger

Explaining there was still a 40 per cent chance the condition could return, Molly-Mae told fans she knew surgery was the next step.

Endometriosis occurs when cells in the lining of the womb are found elsewhere in the body.

Each month, these cells react in the same way as those in the womb; building up, breaking down and bleeding. Yet, the blood has no way to escape the body.

Symptoms can include pain, heavy periods and fatigue, as well as a higher risk of infertility, and bowel and bladder problems.

, ‘My stomach’s still not back to normal’: Molly-Mae Hague debuts her scars from endometriosis surgery, The Today News USA

What is endometriosis? How the disorder results in pelvic pain and internal scarring

Endometriosis is an often painful disorder in which tissue similar to the lining of the uterus – the endometrium – grows outside the uterus.

It most commonly affects the ovaries, Fallopian tubes and the tissue lining the pelvis.

The primary symptom of endometriosis is pelvic pain although many women also experience cramping during their menstrual cycle.

Symptoms also include painful periods, pain with intercourse, pain with bowel movements or urination, inflammation, excessive bleeding and infertility. 

Often misdiagnosed, many women only discover they have the condition during infertility treatment.

Approximately half of women diagnosed with endometriosis have difficulty getting pregnant.

While studies about the link between endometriosis and miscarriages are still ongoing, newer research suggests that the condition can leave sufferers at greater risk of having a miscarriage. 

Source: Mayo Clinic 

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