Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

Lawyers for the three white men accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery rested their case Thursday, but not before gunman Travis McMichael told the jury that the black jogger did not speak, brandish a weapon or directly threaten him before the he shot him dead. 

‘He did not threaten me verbally,’ McMichael said, however he added that he was ‘under the impression’ Arbery was a threat because he was running straight at him. 

The shooter also said he saw Arbery trying to get into the truck of neighbor William ‘Roddie’ Bryan Jr who had joined in the pursuit of the black jogger. 

After ten days of dramatic testimony, the prosecution and lawyers for Travis McMichael, 35, his father, Gregory McMichael, 65, and neighbor William ‘Roddie’ Bryan Jr., 52, are done presenting evidence to the jury. 

A nine-count indictment charges all three with one count of malice murder, four counts of felony murder, two counts of aggravated assault, one count of false imprisonment and one count of criminal attempt to commit false imprisonment. All three men have pleaded not guilty to the charges.

During the trial, the defense argues that Travis McMichael shot Arbery three times in self-defense, as the McMichaels and Bryan attempted to conduct a citizen’s arrest of Arbery under their suspicion that he committed a burglary at a nearby property.

They also argued that the chasing of Arbery was justified under Georgia’s 19th-century citizen’s arrest law that was repealed after an outcry over the killing. 

However, the prosecution alleged the defendants wrongly assumed the worst about Arbery and demonstrated ‘malice aforethought’ when they illegally chased the 25-year-old through the streets in pickup trucks and shot him. 

The state also sought to rebut arguments that the defendants were attempting a valid citizen’s arrest, which required that someone have ‘reasonable and probable’ suspicion that a person is fleeing a serious crime they committed. 

Court will resume on Monday morning for closing statements. Afterwards, the jury will be tasked with deciding whether any of the defendants are guilty of murder.

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

Lawyers for the three white men accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery rested their case Thursday, but not before gunman Travis McMichael (pictured) told the jury that the black jogger did not speak, brandish a weapon or directly threaten him before the he shot him dead

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

McMichael said, however he added that he was ‘under the impression’ Arbery was a threat because he was running straight at him (Pictured: Struggle between McMichael and Arbery)

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

Jurors in the trial of the three men charged in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery (pictured) must decide whether any of the defendants are guilty of murder 

Travis McMichael, the only defendant to testify in the case, returned to the witness stand Thursday after the defense failed again to block religious leaders from sitting in the courtroom. 

Gunman Travis McMichael, 35, recalled what he said was the most traumatic event of his life.

Prosecutor Linda Dunikoski, during cross-examination, asked the defendant why he was nervous when he gave his statement at police headquarters following the February 2020 shooting.

‘I just killed a man. I had blood on me still. It was the most dramatic moment in my life,’ Travis McMichael told the jury.

McMichael has claimed self-defense but revealed to the prosecution that Thursday that Arbery did not speak, brandish a weapon or directly threaten him before the shooting.  

Meanwhile, hundreds of pastors both rallied and prayed Thursday outside the Glynn County courthouse, gathering in response to a defense lawyer’s bid to keep black ministers out of the courtroom. 

Rev. Al Sharpton announced the rally after a attorney Kevin Gough, appearing for Bryan, intensified frustrations in the coastal Georgia community of Brunswick when he said he didn’t want ‘any more black pastors’ sitting in the courtroom with Arbery’s family.  

Gough made a third attempt to convince Superior Court Judge Timothy Walmsley to ban black pastors and civil rights activists – previously claiming they could intimidating for the 11 white jurors on the panel.

‘The court has already ruled on the motion at least twice,’ Superior Court Judge Timothy Walmsley said. ‘I’m looking in the gallery and I don’t even see the two individuals that, Mr. Gough, you have raised as issues and the court is not going to address this matter this morning.’  

Travis McMichael is accused with his ex-cop father Gregory McMichael, 65, and Bryan, 52 – who took the cell phone footage of Arbery’s death.  

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

Walmsley will decide on Thursday before Travis McMichael steps down from the witness stand whether a jury can hear from him about a racial slur officials say he uttered as Arbery lay dying on the pavement

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

The above map shows Ahmaud Arbery’s approximate path and locations of the events that occurred on February 23, 2020

  • Travis McMichael took to the stand for a second day and is being cross-examined by the prosecution over the murder of Ahmaud Arbery
  • On Wednesday, he told the jury that he was acting in self defense when he killed Arbery, and he thought he was a burglar
  • On Tuesday, the jury was shown graphic post portem photos of Arbery 
  • The prosecution presented evidence it said showed the McMichaels and neighbor William ‘Roddie’ Bryan wrongly assumed the worst about Arbery 
  • Gregory McMichael told investigators after the shooting that the three defendants had Arbery ‘trapped like a rat’ with their pickup trucks 
  • Arbery was shot three times and medical examiner, Dr. Edmond Donoghue, determined his cause of death was the result of multiple shotgun wounds   
  • Donoghue told the jury the shot that struck Arbery’s his left chest and armpit alone was enough to kill him 
  • 13 shotgun pellets exited his back and 11 more were recovered from his wounds
  • Meanwhile, defense attorney Kevin Gough openly opposed the presence of black pastors at the trial, arguing that civil rights icons like Rev. Al Sharpton and Rev. Jesse Jackson were influencing the jury
  • Gough has motioned for a mistrial four times, however the judge denied has request

McMichael, 35, is one of three white men on trial for the killing of 25-year-old Arbery in their neighborhood of Satilla Shores near the coastal city of Brunswick on Feb. 23, 2020. 

Under cross examination, McMichael described to a jury his emotions sitting in a police station after he killed Arbery.

He said: ‘I was still in stress and under the impact of what happened a couple of hours after the shooting. Under stress, nervous, scared.’

Prosecutor Linda Dunikoski: ‘So what were you nervous about?’

McMichael: ‘I just killed a man. I had blood on me still. It was the most traumatic event of my life. I was scared to death. I don’t know anybody who wouldn’t be scared, stressed or terrified or anything. I mean it was horrible.’

Dunikoski: ‘You were nervous because you thought you were going to jail, right?’

McMichael: ‘No. I was going through an investigation.

McMichael described his emotions after prosecutor Dunikoski picked him up on whether or not he told Arbery the police were coming.

The accused said on day one of his testimony that he told the black jogger ‘hey, the police are on the way’.

But Dunikoski told the court McMichael never referred to that in his interview hours later with Detective Sergeant Rod Nohilly.

Of the different versions, McMichael conceded he had not explicitly said in his statement that he told the jogger cops were coming. ‘I was all over the place when I was giving that statement,’ he said.

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery ‘did not threaten me verbally’ as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

William ‘Roddie’ Bryan Jr (left), who filmed the pursuit on his cellphone, was sworn in Wednesday. Gregory McMichael (right), was also sworn in Wednesday to possibly testify. Their attorneys have not disclosed if they will take the stand or not

Prosecution vs. Defense: The arguments in Ahmaud Arbery’s murder trial

Gregory McMichael, Travis McMichael and William Bryan are all charged with malice and felony murder in the February 2020 shooting death of black jogger Ahmaud Arbery.  

The McMichaels armed themselves and jumped in a pickup truck to pursue Arbery after he ran past their home from a nearby house under construction.

Their neighbor, Bryan, joined the chase in his own truck, telling police that he tried to run Arbery off the road and then recorded cellphone video as Travis McMichael fired three shotgun blasts before Arbery fell facedown in the street. 

The defendants also face charges of aggravated assault, false imprisonment and criminal attempt to commit a felony. 

During the trial, the prosecution aimed to prove that the defendants wrongly assumed the worst about Arbery.

The state also sought to rebut arguments that the defendants were attempting a valid citizen’s arrest, which required that someone have ‘reasonable and probable’ suspicion that a person is fleeing a serious crime they committed.

The defense argues that Travis McMichael shot Arbery three times in self-defense, as the McMichaels and Bryan attempted to conduct a citizen’s arrest of Arbery under their suspicion that he committed a burglary at a nearby property.

They also argued that the chasing of Arbery was justified under Georgia’s 19th-century citizen’s arrest law that was repealed after an outcry over the killing. 

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Dunikoski also described the scene. Speaking to McMichael, she said: ‘You just shot Mr. Arbery three times with a shotgun.

‘And your father came up to you and grabbed you by the shoulders and went, You had no choice, You had no choice. Right? You’re covered in Mr. Arbery’s blood. You go down to the police station. At that point you are in the safety of the police department giving your statement.

‘You got all the time in the world. And Detective Nohilly hasn’t threatened you. Hasn’t force you to make a statement. But you’re telling this jury that you’re all confused and you can’t get the facts straight as you’re telling the police about why it was you shot and killed a man?’  

‘I’ve never been through a situation like that,’ he replied. 

Prosecutor Dunikoski continued to try to pick apart McMichael’s courtroom testimony compared to his interview with Detective Nohilly.

The accused admitted he did not directly tell the officer in their interview that Arbery grabbed the shotgun in their tussle. This was despite describing to the jury the previous day in detail that the young black jogger did try to get hold of it, which led to the fatal shooting.

He said he remembered Nohilly asking him if Arbery grabbed the gun. In the police report transcript read to the court, he said: ‘He came up me and I think that’s when he hit me or started striking. He was on me. He had my shirt, you know.

‘I had the gun. I was too close to draw down on him. I did like that you know, and he’s still fighting, fighting, and I was just like…’

Nohilly specifically asked: ‘Do you remember if he grabbed the shotgun at all?’ McMichael replied: ‘I want to say he did but honestly I do not remember. I mean, me and him were face to face the entire time.’

McMichael responded in court Thursday saying: ‘I was trying to think of that exact moment, trying to give him as much detail as possible under the stress of what’s going on.

‘It was obvious that he had the gun from what I was saying, he had the weapon the way I was describing. But he did not have the gun at that second, I don’t know why. I won’t say he did, but I honestly cannot remember.’

Dunikoski said to him: ‘So you didn’t shoot him because he grabbed your shotgun, you shot him because he came round that corner and you were right there and you just pulled that trigger immediately.’

McMichael replied: ‘No, I was struck.. that’s when I shot him…it happened so fast I obviously missed every minute detail.’

The accused also admitted he never told Arbery he was making a citizen’s arrest as he followed him in his truck and tried to talk with him. Defense lawyers have argued their clients were trying to make a lawful citizen’s arrest under a now rescinded Georgia law.

Dunikoski said to McMichael: ‘You never told police that you said to Mr. Arbery, you’re under arrest.’ McMichael: ‘I did not.’

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

Grainy video footage of Ahmaud Arbery roaming around a partly-constructed home on five occasions in the months before he was shot dead last year was played in front of the jury Thursday

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

The 25-year-old is seen above at the same home on February 23, 2020 – the day he was chased and killed

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

The prosecutor followed up: ‘In fact you never did tell Mr. Arbery, you’re under arrest for the crime of.. fill in the blank.’ McMichael responded: ‘I didn’t have time. I was still trying to get him to stop.

McMichael was also quizzed over his comments in a local Facebook group concerned with crime in the area. He agreed that on one he commented on an incident: ‘Hope ya’ll catch the vermin.’

The younger McMichael said he tried to be calm when calling out to Arbery during the chase. Dunikoski contrasted that with the more aggressive language his father used recounting events to the police how they trapped Arbery ‘like a rat.’

Dunikoski pointed to a part of a map illustrating the chase.

‘You stop, you get out and yelled, ‘Stop! Stop!’ That’s when your father yelled at him, ‘Stop or I’ll blow your f*****g head off?”

McMichael said he not think so.

‘I mean, you’re standing right there, you heard your father say this, yes?’

‘I don’t think I heard it,’ McMichael replied.

‘But you know that’s what he told the police he said?’ McMichael said he had only heard that in court.

The two McMichaels are standing trial alongside their neighbor William ‘Roddie’ Bryan, who jumped in his own pickup truck and joined the chase after seeing it go past his driveway. His cellphone video of the shooting caused outrage.

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

The jury was shown images of Arbery’s clothing on Tuesday, torn apart by bullet holes

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

According to the medical examiner’s Tuesday testimony, the shot that struck Arbery’s left chest and armpit (pictured) alone was lethal enough to kill the jogger

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

An x-ray image presented to the jury Tuesday showed Arbery’s injuries

Prosecutors allege jury in Arbery trial is ‘disproportionately white’

Prosecutors claim the jury seated for Ahmaud Arbery’s murder trial is disproportionately white.

Of the 12 members, one juror is black while the other 11 are white.

Defense lawyers struck all but one black person from the jury panel, drawn from a county where about a quarter of residents are black, but told the court the strikes were for reasons that had nothing to do with race. 

Superior Court Judge Timothy Walmsley previously said he found that ‘intentional discrimination’ by defense attorneys appeared to have shaped jury selection, but argued Georgia law limited his authority to intervene.

He also alleged that the defense had race-neutral arguments for dismissing those potential jurors.

‘They have been able to explain to the court why besides race those individuals were struck from the panel,’ Walmsley said.

Summons were sent to 1,000 potential jurors and attorneys questioned these individuals for more than two weeks before selecting the current panel.

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The McMichaels told police that they chased Arbery in a pickup truck because they thought he looked like a burglar, and Bryan joined the chase after they went by his driveway.

Defense lawyers have said the men were trying to stop Arbery under a now-repealed Georgia citizen’s arrest law, and the younger McMichael shot him in self defense. The McMichaels and Bryan face life in prison if convicted of murder.

Cellphone video of the shooting taken by Bryan was widely seen on the internet about two months after Arbery’s death and caused a national uproar before charges were ultimately brought. 

McMichael told jurors his decision to grab a gun and chase Arbery was driven by an encounter 12 days before, when he saw the black man ‘creeping in the shadows’ at night around a house under construction nearby. McMichael stated he thought Arbery was armed at that time. 

Police have said nothing was taken on that day. The property’s owner has said through his lawyer that Arbery probably stopped to drink from a water faucet. 

Arbery had nothing on him besides his running clothes and shoes on the day he was shot. 

Defense lawyers have said the men were legally trying to stop Arbery under a now-repealed Georgia citizen’s arrest law.

McMichael, however, repeatedly said he chased Arbery only to ask him questions and that he wrongly believed his father had called 911. 

Hundreds of black pastors Thursday thronged outside the Brunswick Superior courthouse – led by the Rev. Jesse Jackson – in response to defense attorney Kevin Gough’s three-times failed bid to have them banned from the Ahmaud Arbery murder trial. 

The civil rights activist was with Arbery’s mother Wanda Cooper-Jones and father Marcus last week, and stood with them below the court building steps Thursday to address the hundreds outside in protest at the controversial bid.

Referring to Gough, Sharpton said: ‘He wanted to know why we’re there last week, I’m here this week.. and we will keep coming until we get justice.

‘You’ve never seen a gathering of black pastors like this. When he insulted one, he insulted all of us. He didn’t just say enough of the civil rights leaders, he said no more black pastors. He called them black pastors. He didn’t even say can’t have white pastors.

‘Well if you thought one was enough, look at what you brought now.’

Sharpton and fellow activist the Rev. Jesse Jackson led the protest, organized specifically because of remarks by Gough who alleged the 11 white jurors on the panel of 12 could be intimidated by their presence. He even equated it to white people dressed as KFC founder Colonel Sanders intimidating black jurors if the roles were reversed.

The civil rights leader told the crowd: ‘I came to the trial to console them (the family) because you can’t imagine the pain of a mother who sit there and look at the killers of her son and their families and nobody is sitting there with her.

‘The pain of a father who wont get a call from his son any more. I did not come in the court room to protest, I came to pray that they would have the strength to stand up.

‘Now, I do protest. But I came as a minister. And this man the next day defiled me for coming. And said, why was I there? That we must have an agenda. Yes, our agenda is that the God we serve will get straight to this woman and this man and this family.

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

Rev. Jesse Jackson (left) sits with Wanda Cooper-Jones, mother of Ahmaud Arbery, during the trial of the killers of Arbery at the Glynn County Courthouse on November 18

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

Pastor Keith Paschal (right) of the Seventh Day Adventists stood among the throng – many carrying placards saying ‘Black Pastors Matter’

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

Protestors hold placards as Rev. Al Sharpton and other pastors gather outside of Ahmaud Arbery’s murder trial

‘And an agenda that God would give us justice in this courtroom. We did not come for an ulterior move. We don’t know if there were any ministers in the court room before, we don’t know who sit with the defendants right now. Are you going to question who sits with them? We’ve never questioned who sits with them.’

Speaking of the family again, he said: ‘I want them to have the comfort that people came from all over the world… we got on planes and buses and stand with Wanda and stand with Marcus. And say you’re not standing by yourself.

Cooper-Jones told the crowd: ‘When Ahmaud was killed my family had some of the darkest times of my life. We asked questions, we got no answers. We submitted emails, but no reply back. But in the midst of all that I prayed.’ 

The throng followed in a procession led by Sharpton. 

Civil rights attorney Ben Crump joined the reverend on stage and they led the group in singing ‘amen’.

They were joined by peaceful crowds of white Christian clergy, rabbis and other groups from around the United States. In the background, a woman was singing spirituals.

The black pastors came from as far as California to protest at Gough’s bid to get judge Timothy Walmsley to prevent Jackson and the Rev Al Sharpton from supporting Arbery’s family in court – claiming their presence could intimidate the 11 white jurors on the panel of 12.

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

Rabbi Suzanne Griffel traveled from Chicago to show her support. She said: ‘We are here in support and solidarity so when Mr. Gough said ‘we don’t want any more black pastors here’ we responded to the call in solidarity with the black pastors who are coming today to show that we are all together’

Pastor Keith Paschal of the Seventh Day Adventists stood among the throng – many carrying placards saying ‘Black Pastors Matter’ – said: ‘There is need for different groups to come together, especially for a community. And it has happened throughout the course of this country’s history.’

The pastor, from Lake City, Florida, continued: ‘For change to happen different groups have unified to affect the proper change in the proper manner. That’s what we are expecting to happen today.

‘Not just for the trial’s sake. But for the sake of communities around the country.’

Of the Gough comments, he said: ‘We are hoping a mental change will take place. That the atmosphere of the mind will change the disposition. The comments that were mad were adverse… the black pastors heard the call to come here.

‘When you challenge one group in this position you are also directly challenging all groups in those same positions, which is why we have support from many other groups here today. So you don’t just have white pastors out here, you have white pastors, you’ve got rabbis that come.’

Rabbi Suzanne Griffel, traveled from Chicago to be outside the court. She said: ‘We are here in support and solidarity so when Mr. Gough said ‘we don’t want any more black pastors here’ we responded to the call in solidarity with the black pastors who are coming today to show that we are all together.

‘A local Rabbi here in Brunswick put out the call to come down. There’s somebody from San Francisco, a couple form New York, somebody from Philadelphia, somebody form Boston.’

Georgia Pastor K. A. Zachary Jnr said: ‘At a time like this we had to come together to show that injustice to one is injustice to us all, as Dr. King said many years ago.

‘We’ve got hundreds of black pastors here, far more than the 100 talked about last week. And we are not just saying black pastors. All the groups are together for this cause.

‘We want people to know that we won’t stand for killing, or lynching. This is not something that should be blind to the eyesight. It was very derogatory for Mr. Gough to make a statement such as that. That was a low blow. It was something he felt threatened by, black pastors.’

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

Pastors assemble outside of the Glynn County courthouse

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

The rally of approximately 100 pastors was planned in response to defense attorney Kevin Gough’s first incendiary attempt to remove religious leaders from the courthouse when he said ‘we don’t any more black pastors here’

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

A woman protests outside the court house where three men are on trial for Ahmaud Arbery’s murder

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

, Travis McMichael says Ahmaud Arbery &#8216;did not threaten me verbally&#8217; as defense rests its case, The Today News USA

A man, amidst a crowd of protesters, holds a Black Lives Matter sign outside the Glynn County courthouse